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In Depth

Afghanistan

In the line of duty: Canada's casualties

Last Updated April 20, 2007

At a glance: Deaths in Afghanistan

Deaths by year
2007 10
2006 36 military, 1 diplomat
2005 1
2004 1
2003 2
2002 4
How they died (2002-2006)
Combat / attacked / explosions 43
Friendly fire 6
Accidental 4
Under investigation 2

Master Cpl. Anthony Klumpenhouwer

Killed A special operations soldier died when he fell while climbing a communications tower on April 18, 2007.
CBC Story

Master Cpl. Allan Stewart

Killed Two killed and three injured in two separate roadside bombings on April 11, west of Kandahar.
CBC Story

Trooper Patrick James Pentland

Killed

Pte. David Robert Greenslade

Killed Killed when their vehicle hit a roadside bomb on April 8, 2007, west of Kandahar City.
CBC Story

Pte. Kevin Vincent Kennedy

Killed

Sgt. Donald Lucas

Killed

Cpl. Aaron E. Williams

Killed

Cpl. Christopher P. Stannix

Killed

Cpl. Brent Poland

Killed

Cpl. Kevin Megeney

Killed Shot in the chest at Kandahar airfield on March 6, 2007. Death under investigation
CBC Story

Chief Warrant Officer Robert Girouard

Killed Killed by a suicide car bomb on Nov. 27, 2006, near Kandahar
CBC Story

Cpl. Albert Storm

Killed

Sgt. Darcy Tedford

Killed Killed on Oct. 14, 2006 after militants ambushed them with grenades and gunfire
CBC Story

Pte. Blake Williamson

Killed

Trooper Mark Andrew Wilson

Killed Killed by a roadside bomb on Oct. 7, 2006, in the Panjwaii district west of Kandahar
CBC Story

Sgt. Craig Paul Gillam

Killed Killed after sustained mortar and small arms attack on Oct. 3, 2006. Five other soldiers wounded
CBC Story

Cpl. Robert Thomas James Mitchell

Killed

Pte. Josh Klukie

Killed Killed in an explosion, Sept. 29, 2006
CBC Story

Pte. David Byers

Killed Killed by suicide bomber while they were on a security patrol, Sept. 18, 2006
CBC Story

Cpl. Glen Arnold

Killed

Cpl. Shane Keating

Killed

Cpl. Keith Morley

Killed

Pte. Mark Anthony Graham

Killed Two U.S. A-10 Thunderbolts mistakenly fire on Canadian soldiers, Sept. 4, 2006
CBC Story

30 soldiers

Wounded

Sgt. Shane Stachnik

Killed Air and ground offensive against the Taliban, Sept. 3, 2006
CBC Story

Warrant Officer Frank Robert Mellish

Killed

Warrant Officer Richard Francis Nolan

Killed

Pte. William Jonathan James Cushley

Killed

9 soldiers

Wounded

1 soldier

Wounded Mortar attack, Aug. 28, 2006
CBC Story

1 soldier

Wounded Mortar attack, Aug. 27, 2006
CBC Story

Cpl. David Braun

Killed Suicide Attack, Aug. 22, 2006
CBC Story

3 Soldiers

Wounded

Cpl. Andrew James Eykelenboom

Killed Suicide bombing, Aug. 11, 2006
CBC Story

Master Cpl. Jeffrey Scott Walsh

Killed Shooting incident, Aug. 9, 2006. Death under investigation
CBC Story

Master Cpl. Raymond Arndt

Killed Traffic accident, Aug. 5, 2006
CBC Story

3 Soldiers

Wounded

Sgt. Vaughn Ingram

Killed Rocket attack, Aug. 3, 2006
CBC Story

Cpl. Bryce Jeffrey Keller

Killed

Pte. Kevin Dallaire

Killed

6 soldiers

Wounded

3 soldiers

Wounded Roadside bomb, Aug. 3, 2006
CBC story

Cpl. Christopher Jonathan Reid

Killed Roadside bomb, Aug. 3, 2006
CBC Story

1 soldier

Wounded

Cpl. Francisco Gomez

Killed Suicide attack, July 22, 2006
CBC Story

Cpl. Jason Patrick Warren

Killed

8 soldiers

Wounded

Cpl. Anthony Boneca

Killed Firefight, July 9, 2006
CBC story

2 soldiers

Wounded Firefight, July 8, 2006
CBC story

2 soldiers

Wounded Rocket attack, June 30, 2006
CBC story

2 soldiers

Wounded Suicide attack, June 21, 2006
CBC story

4 soldiers

Wounded Roadside bomb, June 21, 2006
CBC story

5 soldiers

Wounded Roadside bomb, May 25, 2006
CBC story

Capt. Nichola Goddard

Killed Combat, May 17, 2006
Details

Cpl. Matthew Dinning

Killed Roadside bomb, April 22, 2006
Details

Bombardier Myles Mansell

Killed

Lt. William Turner

Killed

Cpl. Randy Payne

Killed

2 soldiers

Wounded Roadside bomb, April 19, 2006
Details

3 soldiers

Injured Traffic accident, April 14, 2006
Details

2 soldiers

Injured Traffic accident, April 2, 2006
Details

1 soldier

Wounded Suicide attack, March 30, 2006
Details

Pte. Robert Costall

Killed Firefight, March 29, 2006
Details

3 soldiers

Wounded

Capt. Trevor Greene

Wounded Axe attack, March 4, 2006
Details

5 soldiers

Wounded Suicide attack, March 3, 2006
Details

Cpl. Paul Davis

Killed LAV III crash, March 2, 2006
Details

Master Cpl. Timothy Wilson

Killed

5 soldiers

Injured

3 soldiers

Injured G-wagon rollover, Feb. 15, 2006
Details

Diplomat Glyn Berry

Killed Suicide attack, Jan. 15, 2006
Details

3 soldiers

Wounded

3 soldiers and 1 journalist

Wounded IED attack, Dec. 12, 2005
Details

Pte. Braun Scott Woodfield

Killed LAV III rollover, Nov. 24, 2005
Details

4 soldiers

Injured

Cpl. Jamie Brendan Murphy

Killed Suicide attack, Jan. 27, 2004
Details

3 soldiers

Wounded

Sgt. Robert Alan Short

Killed Landmine explosion, Oct. 2, 2003
Details

Cpl. Robbie Christopher Beerenfenger

Killed

3 soldiers

Wounded

Sgt. Marc D. Leger

Killed "Friendly fire" incident, April 18, 2002
Details

Cpl. Ainsworth Dyer

Killed

Pte. Richard Green

Killed

Pte. Nathan Smith

Killed

8 soldiers

Wounded

A Tribute To Our Canadian Forces
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Prime Minister of Canada Robert Borden at the outbreak at the Great War

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 On August 4, 1914, Britain declared war on Germany. Canada, as a member of the British Empire, was automatically at war, and its citizens from all across the land responded quickly. A month after war broke out, 32,665 volunteers arrived at the new camp at Valcartier, Quebec, in 100 special trains. Thus began the growth of the colony's peacetime army from a pre-war force of 3,110 regular and 74,213 part-time militia members. By the end of the war, Canada would have 619,636 service people in uniform, including more than 3,000 Nursing Sisters. The tiny peacetime force would grow nearly tenfold. It was a huge army for a population of less than eight million.

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The underlying tension between French and English Canada exploded during World War I. Prior to the war, the French Canadians did not see themselves obliged to serve the British interests.

The issue reached its zenith when Canadian Prime Minister Robert Borden introduced the Canadian Military Service Act of 1917. Although some farmers and factory workers opposed the legislation, it was in Quebec where conscription was most vociferously denounced. Leading the campaign against conscription was Quebec nationalist Henri Bourassa and Sir Wilfrid Laurier who argued that the war pitted Canadians against each other. In the subsequent election, Robert Borden was able to convince enough English speaking Liberals to vote for him. In the Canadian Federal Election of 1917, the Union government won 153 seats, nearly all from English Canada. The Liberals won 82 seats. Although the Union government won a large majority of seats, the Union government won only 3 seats in Quebec.

Of the 120,000 conscripts raised during the war, only 47,000 actually went overseas. Despite this, the rift between French and English-speaking Canadians was indelible and would last for many years to come.

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'Horrors of Trench Fighting'
'With the Canadian Heroes'
told by Romeo Heule, of the First Canadian Division

Ypres is the graveyard of the old Sixty-fifth. We were carried to within six miles of the place in London buses, twenty-five men in a bus. Ypres was forty miles away. We met there the Canadian Scottish Third Brigade of 5,000 men. From the end of the bus line we tramped six miles and encamped outside the village of St. Julien, one mile away. Two battalions were in reserve at St. Jean and two were in the front line, mine being one of the two at the front.

___________________________________________________________________

Over 6,000 Canadians lost their lives before the reinforcements arrived. Canadians gained a reputation as a formidable fighting force. Moreover, it was the first time that a colonial force caused a major European power to retreat.

The Canadians saw many battles during World War I. The first was in the French town of Neuve Chapelle. Then in the first week of April 1915, the soldiers of the 1st Canadian Division were moved to reinforce the Ypres salient. The next area where Canadians fought was at the Battle of the Somme from mid-September to mid-November. In early 1917, a massive assault was planned with a French attack in the south and a British diversion at Arras. Here, the Canadian Corps were given the responsibility of assaulting and taking Vimy Ridge—the only significant height of land in northeastern France.

Following the Canadian success at Vimy, Douglas Haig launched his controversial drive in Flanders to seize strategic rail heads and capture the German submarine bases on the Belgian coast. On October 30th, the Canadian forces were ordered to relieve the decimated ANZAC forces in the Ypres sector. General Arthur Currie argued that the milieu was too muddy and protested that the operation was impossible without a heavy cost, but he was overruled. Currie estimated that the Canadian forces would suffer 16,000 casualties in the taking of Passchendaele, an estimation that turned out to be accurate (the Canadian forces suffered 15,654 casualties).

Throughout these three final months, the Canadian troops saw action in several areas. The first was near the salient of Amiens on August 8th where the Canadian Corps (along with the Australians, French and British) was charged with the task of spearheading the assault on the German forces in Amiens. In the subsequent battle, the morale of the German forces was badly shaken. In Ludendorff's words, the battle of Arras was a "black day for the German army." After their breakthrough at Amiens, the Canadians were shifted back to Arras and given the task of cracking the Hindenburg Line in the Arras area.

Between August 26 and September 2nd, the Canadian Corp launched multiple attacks near the German front at Canal du Nord. On September 27, 1918, the Canadian Forces broke through the Hindenburg Line by smashing through a dry section of the Canal du Nord. The operation ended in triumph on October 11, 1918, when the Canadian forces drove the Germans out of their main distribution centre in Battle of Cambrai.

In the final one hundred days of the war, the Canadian Corps marched successfully to Mons. However, during this period, the Canadian Corps suffered 46,000 casualties. The last Canadian to be killed was George Lawrence Price, 2 minutes before the armistice took effect at 11 a.m. on November 11. He is traditionally recognized as being the last soldier killed during the entire war.

There were more than 66000 Canadians lost in World War I

In Canada Remembrance Day is always observed on 11 November and the day is a holiday for federal government employees. Common British, Canadian, South African and ANZAC traditions include two minutes of silence at the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month because that was the time (in Britain) when the armistice became effective. The poppy's significance to Remembrance Day is a result of Canadian military physician John McCrae's poem In Flanders Fields. The poppy emblem was chosen because of the poppies that bloomed across some of the worst battlefields of Flanders in World War I, their red colour an appropriate symbol for the bloodshed of trench warfare.

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Bristol Fighter

A total of 4,747 had been produced by September 1919 and the vast majority of them served with the RFC and the RAF dur the First World War in Italy, the Middle East, the Western Front and in the home defence role in Britain. Although the US Army condemned the airframe as dangerous after trials where the Liberty engine replacement they were pressing for proved to make the Aircraft nose heavy and difficult to fly, crews flying the "Brisfits" built up impressive records. For instance in an action fought by two pilots of No. 22 Squadron on 7 May, 1918 while the two F.2Bs were patrolling over Arras they were attacked by a superior force of seven Fokkers the two machines shot down four of the enemy. The F.2Bs were in turn attacked by a new force of 15 enemy fighters, whereupon they promptly shot down four more Fokkers, and broke off the engagement only when their ammunition was exhausted.
The Canadian Air Force only ever held two "Brisfits" or "Bifs" on strength from 6 August, 1920 to 7 February, 1922 as part of an Imperial Gift of 114 varied Aircraft, however Canadian airmen flew the two-seat fighters in the service of the Royal Flying Corps as well as the CAF during the First World War. Canadian Air Service pilot Lt. A.E. McKeever of No. 11 Squadron soon began to be regarded as an ace among Bristol Fighter exponents, and between himself and his regular observer, Sgt. (later Lt.) L.F. Powell accounted for 28 Aircraft from the time of their first victory on 26 June, 1917 and the end of the year. With the formation of No. 1 Squadron, Canadian Air Force, McKeever was appointed its commanding officer and he adopted the Bristol Fighter as his personal Aircraft. This machine later went with him when he returned to Canada after the Armistice and was later registered on the Canadian Civil Registry as G-CYBC. More...
 

Excerpts from the Handbook for Air Force Non-Commissioned Members

The Heritage
Historical imageThe Book of Remembrance in the Memorial Chamber of the House of Parliament in Ottawa records the names of the 1,563 airmen who gave their lives during World War I. Over 800 decorations were awarded to Canadian airmen, including three Victoria Crosses (VCs). The VC was instituted by Queen Victoria during her reign in the 1800s, and was the British Empire's highest award for bravery.

The Battle Front
Canadians flew on every type of operation and on every front of the war. They distinguished themselves as fighter, bomber, and flying-boat pilots, army co-operation crews, and balloon observers. They flew over the Western Approaches, the English Channel, the North Sea, and the Western Front in Belgium and France. Other areas of involvement included the Italian Front, the Adriatic and the Mediterranean, Macedonia and Thrace, the Aegean Sea and the Dardanelles, Egypt, Palestine and Mesopotamia, the Red Sea, the Indian Ocean, and German East Africa. The achievements of Canadians during the World War I are part of the rich tradition of the Air Force.  More...

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"The man, be rich or poor, is little to be envied, who at this supreme moment fails to bring forward his life savings for the security of his country." Slogan to be found on the application for a Victory Bond during the 1917 Victory Loan campaign.

The Canadian Government sold Victory Bonds to Canadian citizens, private corporations and various organizations in order to raise funds to pay for the war. The bonds were a loan to the government that could be redeemed with interest after 5,10, or 20 years and were released during 5 different campaigns between 1915 and 1919. In 1915 a hundred million dollars worth of Victory Bonds was issued and quickly purchased.

Each Victory Bond release saw a supporting poster campaign overseen by the Victory Loan Dominion Publicity Committee. Over 3,000 of Canada’s Nursing Sisters volunteered at the start of the war. They worked in hospitals and other institutions across Europe and often close to the front lines. 61 nurses died during the war, primarily from sickness.

Posters constantly urged everyone to purchase bonds. Women in the home put money aside from their housekeeping allowance and children were encouraged to collect Thrift Stamps that could be accumulated until enough had been saved to buy a Victory Bond.

The Victory Bond campaign of 1918 was one of the most successful raising over $600,000 in three weeks. Although hostilities ended on the 11th November 1918, another campaign was launched in 1919 focusing on the theme of “Bring Our Boys Back” and the need to raise funds for the rehabilitation of returning soldiers.

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Posters constantly urged everyone to purchase bonds. Women in the home put money aside from their housekeeping allowance and children were encouraged to collect Thrift Stamps that could be accumulated until enough had been saved to buy a Victory Bond.